Dating hiv

However, examination of viral resistance to AD101, molecular antagonist of CCR5, indicated that resistant viruses did not switch to another coreceptor (CXCR4) but persisted in using CCR5, either through binding to alternative domains of CCR5, or by binding to the receptor at a higher affinity.

However, because there is still another co-receptor available, this indicates that lacking the CCR5 gene doesn't make one immune to the virus; it simply implies that it would be more challenging for the individual to contract it. Unlike CCR5, which the body apparently doesn't really need due to those still living healthy lives even with the lack of/or absence of the gene (as a result of the delta 32 mutation), CD4 is critical in the body's defense system (fighting against infection).

Because the Vikings historically occupied these countries, it may be possible that the allele spread throughout Europe was due to the Viking dispersal in the 8th to 10th century.

Therefore, given the average age of roughly 1000 years for the CCR5-Δ32 allele, it can be established that HIV-1 did not exert selection pressure on the human population for long enough to achieve the current frequencies.

Heterozygote carriers are resistant to HIV-1 infection relative to wild types and when infected, heterozygotes exhibit reduced viral loads and a 2-3-year-slower progression to AIDS relative to wild types.

CCR5 Δ32 has an (heterozygote) allele frequency of 10% in Europe, and a homozygote frequency of 1%.

This is the process by which T cells are attracted to specific tissue and organ targets.

Many forms of HIV, the virus that causes AIDS, initially use CCR5 to enter and infect host cells.

Two studies have used linkage analysis to estimate the age of the CCR5 Δ32 deletion, assuming that the amount of recombination and mutation observed on genomic regions surrounding the CCR5 Δ32 deletion would be proportional to the age of the deletion.Using a sample of 4000 individuals from 38 ethnic populations, Stephens et al.estimated that the CCR5-Δ32 deletion occurred 700 years ago (275-1875, 95% confidence interval). (1998), estimated the age of the CCR5 Δ32 mutation is based on the microsatellite mutations to be 2100 years (700-4800, 95% confidence interval).On the basis of observed recombination events, they estimated the age of the mutation to be 2250 years (900-4700, 95% confidence interval).A third hypothesis relies on the north-to-south gradient of allele frequency in Europe which shows that the highest allele frequency occurred in Nordic regions such as Iceland, Norway and Sweden and lowest allele frequency in the south.

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