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It was a warm, sunny morning, and she was sitting at her desk in the company’s office, located above a pizza shop in San Mateo, an idyllic and affluent suburb of San Francisco.

Mora-Blanco was one of 60-odd twenty-somethings who’d come to work at the still-unprofitable website.

And many a rant towards pirates have been made saying that they actually need to make money or else they won't be able to produce further installments. It's been pointed out that very few people who do webcomics (for example) actually make off of them, with most of them doing it as a hobby.

Julie Mora-Blanco remembers the day, in the summer of 2006, when the reality of her new job sunk in.

A recent grad of California State University, Chico, Mora-Blanco had majored in art, minored in women’s studies, and spent much of her free time making sculptures from found objects and blown-glass.

Their stories reveal how the boundaries of free speech were drawn during a period of explosive growth for a high-stakes public domain, one that did not exist for most of human history.

As law professor Jeffrey Rosen first said many years ago of Facebook, these platforms have "more power in determining who can speak and who can be heard around the globe than any Supreme Court justice, any king or any president." Launched in 2005, You Tube was the brainchild of Chad Hurley, Steve Chen, and Jawed Karim—three men in their 20s who were frustrated because technically there was no easy way for them to share two particularly compelling videos: clips of the 2004 tsunami that had devastated southeast Asia, and Janet Jackson’s Superbowl "wardrobe malfunction." In April of 2005, they tested their first upload.

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